David M. Young, M.D.

David M. Young, M.D.

Professor of Surgery
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Contact Information

Box 0932
505 Parnassus Ave, Moffitt Room 593
San Francisco, CA 94143
Phone (415) 353-4217 (UCSF Medical Center)
Secondary Phone (415) 206-8814 (Zuckerberg SFGH)
David.Young@ucsf.edu
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  • Columbia College, New York, NY, B.A., 1979
  • Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, M.D., 1984
  • Cornell School of Medicine, Intern, Pathology, 1984-1985
  • University of Miami School of Medicine, Resident, General Surgery, 1985-1989
  • University of Miami School of Medicine, Chief Resident, General Surgery, 1989-1990
  • UCSF, Plastic Surgery Resident, 1991-1993
  • Yale School of Medicine (Charles Cuono), Plastic Surgery, Research Fellow, 1990-1991
  • American Board of Surgery, 1992
  • American Board of Plastic Surgery, 1996
  • Abdominoplasty
  • Acute Trauma Hand Surgery
  • Aesthetic Surgery
  • Breast Augentation
  • Breast Lift
  • Breast Reconstruction
  • Breast Reduction
  • Burns and Trauma Reconstruction
  • Facial Rejuvenation
  • Hand and Microvascular Surgery
  • Liposuction
  • Microsurgery
  • Microvascular Reconstruction
  • Reconstructive Hand Surgery
  • Skin Cancer Reconstruction
  • Wound healing
  • Epidemiology and treatment of soft tissue infections
  • Molecular mechanisms of wound healing

Dr. David Young is Professor of Plastic Surgery at UCSF. His area of expertise includes wound healing, microsurgery, and reconstruction after burns and trauma. His research interests include the molecular mechanisms of wound healing and the epidemiology and treatment of soft tissue infections.

Dr. Young is a graduate of Columbia College and earned a medical degree at the Yale University School of Medicine. He trained in pathology at Cornell Medical College and general surgery at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital.  He then completed an NIH-NRSA funded research Fellowship at Yale and a Plastic Surgery Fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco.

Dr. Young is primarily interested in the mechanisms and treatments of normal and abnormal wound healing. He is Principal Investigator on a study pertaining to the role of heat shock proteins, homeobox genes, and hypoxia in cutaneous wound healing.

The effects of manipulating of hypoxia inducible proteins, homeobox genes, and heat shock proteins in wound repair are presently under investigation. In vitro and in vivo models of wound repair are used to study the effects of induction and blockage of these proteins on normal and abnormal healing. Expression of many of these proteins is altered in conditions of poor wound healing as found in patients with diabetes.

Dr. Young hopes to understand how these proteins interact during wound healing and to develop novel methods to improve healing. Dr. Young's research is conducted in the UCSF Surgical Research Laboratory at SFGH. The research is currently funded by a RO-1 grant "Diabetes, Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1, and Delayed Wound Healing" from the NIH-NIGMS.

  1. Yu DH, Mace KA, Hansen, SL, Boudreau N, and Young DM. Effects of Decreased Igf-1 Stimulation on Hif-1a Protein Synthesis and Function During Cutaneous Repair in Diabetic Mice. Wound Repair Regen, 15; 628-35, 2007.  
  2. Mace KA, Yu DH, Paydar KZ, Boudreau N, and Young DM, Sustained Expression of Hif-1alpha in the Diabetic Environment Results in Upregulation of Hif-1 Target Genes and Accelerates Wound Repair, Wound Repair Regen. 15; 636-45, 2007. 
  3. Paydar KZ, Hansen SL, Charlebois ED, Harris HW, Young DM, Inappropriate Antibiotic Use in Soft Tissue Infections. Arch Surg,141:850-4, 2006. 
  4. Rajendran PM., Young DM, Maurer T, Chambers H, Perdreau-Remington F, Ro P, Harris, HW. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Cephalexin for Treatment of Uncomplicated Skin Abscesses in a Population at Risk for Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection. Anti Agent Chem.